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20121027
20121104
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of last resort but pay phones are suddenly in demand on the east coast in the wake of superstorm sandy. the cbs 5 consumerwatch reporter julie watts tells us people who use pay phones often get a wake-up call when they see the bill. julie. >> reporter: that is right. with 25% of the new york city cell towers wiped out new yorkers are now lining up to use pay phones. and here in earthquake country we're just one tremor away from a similar situation but next time you're forced to use a pay phone you may be in for a surprise. [ beep ] >> reporter: it may have been a while since you've used one of these but the next time you make a pay phone call you'll need more than a quarter. try 20 bucks. >> that's pretty extreme. crazy. >> reporter: that's the holding fee that showed up on our bill weather we recently used a debit card to make a 20-second call at this pay phone from the airport to our station merely 13 miles away. the sign on the phone says a domestic call costs 8 contrary to the recording which quotes another pay phone rate. >> on the first minute charge will be $6.97. each addition
. ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, now at 6:30: tempers running high in the areas hardest-hit by superstorm sandy. >>> wire a >>> we're going to die. get the trucks here now. >> tempers running high in areas hit by superstorm sandy. many areas in the northeast getting back to normal but thousands still struggling to get back on their feet. here's the latest. at least 110 people have died from that storm. and that number may rise as search efforts continue. more than 3 million homes and businesses now are without power. that's down though from the height of more than 8 million at the beginning of the storm. damage estimates are expected to reach 50 billion. cbs reporter alison harmelin is in new jersey where the state is crippled without power, roads and gas. >> reporter: good evening, dana. the wind is whipping up again we're told that another snowstorm is on the way and as if things couldn't get worse on the coast, the island behind me is actually being condemned. business is going strong off the back of this u-haul outside seaside heights. entrepreneurs are selling generators and five gallon tanks of gas are goin
can stay 47th... or we can choose proposition 38. i'm voting yes on 38... blow from superstorm sandy. >>> now at:30 the east coast is still reeling tonight after take a tremendous body blow from super storm sandy. the nation's largest city was one of the hardest hit. new york mayor michael bloomberg described the destruction as reminiscent of scenes from world war ii. cbs reporter veneta nail joins us from lower manhattan with the latest. >> reporter: dana, you mentioned the words body blow. what a difference 24 hours makes. 24 hours ago at this time, the area where i'm standing was completely inundated with all of the water you see there. you can see it's a very different scene right now. sandy's powerful winds and storm surge slammed the city and rattled the residents. >> the entire residents here has been flooded out. no electricity. >> reporter: the city is slowly coming back to life. some buses are back on the streets but the mayor says it could take days to get the flooded subway system back on track and tens of thousands are still without power. >> this was a devastating storm
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